Hot Housing Trends for 2015

Hot Housing Trends for 2015

Posted 02/26/2015

Victory-1155--Breezeway

Remember the standard-issue gold shag carpet and avocado-colored appliances gracing typical American homes in the 1970s? How about the teal-and-salmon Southwest color palette of the '80s? Housing trends, it turns out, are somewhat like a time capsule. They take us back to a certain time and place, and in some cases, can even reflect consumers' attitudes about cultural issues ranging from the economy to the environment.  
 
If you're wondering what we'll look back on and remember about this decade, here are a few trends uncovered by the National Association of Homebuilders (NAHB):

Energy efficiency: The NAHB recently polled homebuilders about the features they plan to incorporate into their new homes this year. At the same time, they asked millennials to identify which design elements they would include on their must-have lists. Eco-friendly, energy-efficient homes with green building materials and appliances topped both lists. In fact, millennials who responded to the survey said they'd be willing to pay 2-3 percent more for energy efficiency, as long as they could see a return on their power bills.
 
Relaxation: If the design features included in the winning homes from NAHB's 2014 Best in American Living Awards competition are any indication, homebuyers are all about de-stressing this year. Game rooms, hobby rooms and wine rooms encourage homeowners to retreat from the pressures of the outside world and enjoy time at home, either alone or with others. Additionally, bathroom designs continue to center on providing a spa-like experience. Bathtubs, in particular, are making a comeback, with sculpted, stand-alone models serving as a focal point of the room.
 
Indoor-outdoor living: Removable walls, foldable walls and moving glass wall systems are making it easier for homeowners to stretch their lounging environments beyond the traditional confines. Look for more of these transitional spaces to show up in housing designs this year, according to the NAHB.